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Medical Device industry news

Management Recruiters of Gastonia North help keep medical device professionals tuned to the latest industry news by providing access to the latest in technologies and breakthroughs, as well as resources for both clients and candidates.

Scientists ‘print’ 3D heart using patient’s tissue

Although 3D printing has advanced in leaps and bounds over the past few years, using it to print functioning human organs is still a far-flung dream. Recently, however, scientists have brought this dream one step closer. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control…

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Insight: Is Data Still a Watchword?

Early in my career I would never have used “Data Analytics” (DA) in the same phrase, probably not even in the same sentence and perhaps not even on the same piece of paper!  Yet for the last 20+ years of my life, those words appear together ubiquitously.  Just 2 days ago, I was catching-up with…

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Is an R&D Race Driving the Surgical Robotics Market?

With increasing competition, the way to gain market share in this quickly growing market is with innovative technology. Robotic-assisted surgery has emerged with an attempt to overcome the limitations of traditional minimally invasive surgical procedures. With increasing competition, the way to gain market share in this quickly growing market is with innovative technology. This means…

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Demand for Fertility-Related Devices Expected to Rise

An estimated 8%–12% of couples suffer from infertility around the world, against a backdrop of fertility rates falling globally. LOW FERTILITY GLOBAL FACTORS There are many factors thought to be associated with low fertility rates, one of which is an increase in the maternal age at first birth. Put simply, many women are choosing to…

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A special ‘stained glass’ can help kill hospital ‘superbugs’

New research applies a glass-staining technique that is hundreds of years old to create a material that repels dangerous bacteria and fungi. In the future, specialists could use this “bioactive glass” to create safer clinical tools, such as catheters. A team of researchers from Aston University in Birmingham, in the United Kingdom, has recently applied…

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Getting Scott Kelly’s Blood Back to Earth was a Logistical Nightmare

Rocket explosions, time-sensitive blood draws, and ultrasound tutorials in the dead of night — the science behind the scenes of the NASA’s Twins Study released today was almost more exciting than the results it contained. The study looked at the differences between identical twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kellyin the 25 months surrounding the year that Scott…

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She lived for 99 years with organs in all the wrong places and never knew it

On an early spring day in 2018, the faint smell of formaldehyde floating in the air, 26-year-old medical student Warren Nielsen and four of his classmates prepped a cadaver in the chilly dissection lab at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. Similar groups of five gathered around bodies on the other 15 tables in…

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Researchers develop wearable biosensors that mimic skin’s properties

Researchers from universities in Binghamton and New York have developed a wearable biosensor. This open-mesh electromechanical biosensor is designed to reflect the skin’s microarchitecture. It comprises a biological component and a physiochemical detector that tracks and analyses lactate and oxygen on the skin. The sensor is also embedded with flexible gold sensor cables that mimic…

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First Friday Preview: April

How to Craft a Strong Change Narrative for Your Company When your company is undergoing major change, it can be a tough transition for everyone, especially your organization’s employees. After all, they may be wondering how the company’s transformations will affect them, their roles, responsibilities, co-workers, leadership and other aspects of their lives in the…

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CMS touts ‘more flexibility’ in new TAVR coverage requirements

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have proposed new policy that could expand the use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedures, touting that it may provide more flexibility for starting and maintaining TAVR programs. The original National Coverage Determination for TAVR procedures was cleared in 2012, when the technology and associated procedure was still…

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This toilet seat could detect congestive heart failure

Researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology have developed a toilet seat that could detect congestive heart failure. The toilet seat cardiovascular monitoring system is designed to lower hospital readmission rates of patients who have congestive heart failure. The researchers plan to enter the FDA clearance process through the researchers’ company, Heart Health Intelligence. “Typically…

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FDA ramps up scrutiny of materials in medical devices

The FDA said today it has begun more closely scrutinizing the roles of certain materials associated with harm to patients who have breast implants, nitinol-containing devices, metal-on-metal hip implants and devices made from animal-derived substances. It’s the latest in a series of statements the agency has issued following increasingly harsh public criticism of its efforts…

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FDA to launch scientific review of implant biocompatibility, following patient reactions to certain materials

The FDA has begun to re-evaluate the state of the science around the materials used in long-term medical implants, pointing to a growing body of evidence that suggests a subset of patients may be predisposed to painful responses to the devices. While the vast majority of patients have no adverse reactions to implants constructed of…

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INSIGHT: Does your Risk Management still lead to Unthinkable Consequences?

When you’ve been around manufacturing as long as I have, it’s inevitable to have moments when you wonder whether the latest “thing” is nothing more than a shell game.  I remember in the mid-90’s when Six Sigma and its various belt levels was all the rage.  One of my best contacts at one of our…

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Can we heal wounds by printing skin?

By Monica Beyer Printing layers of skin to help treat chronic wounds or burns may be on the horizon, thanks to a newly developed mobile skin bioprinting system. Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) in Winston-Salem, NC, have created a bioprinter that uses a person’s own skin cells to create layers…

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FDA to Take a Hard Look at Surgical Staple Risks

The agency released a letter to healthcare providers pointing out the risks and said it would hold a public advisory committee meeting. By Omar Ford FDA is working on measures to help reduce the risks associated with surgical staplers and implantable staples. Late last week the agency said it released a letter to healthcare providers to point…

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Who, What, Where, When, and Why? The 5 guideposts of a short story.

As med device engineering recruiters, we can be challenged by some very difficult needs.  Recently a new client had a requirement for someone with highly developed laser-cutting skills.  The challenge was to recruit a person with skills in textiles and a med device engineering background.   At Management Recruiters of Gastonia, we look at these challenges…

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First Friday Preview: March

Setting up the Change Management Process for Success Imagine this scenario: your company is preparing for organizational change now or in the coming months. Maybe you need to restructure in order to drive greater productivity and revenue. Or perhaps change management is necessary at your firm to complete a large merger or acquisition, smoothly and…

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Wireless preemie monitoring system allows more parental contact

By Nancy Crotti A new, less invasive system for monitoring preterm and critically ill newborns’ vital signs would allow parents skin-to-skin contact with their babies when they otherwise couldn’t have it. The system, designed by researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago, uses ultrathin, skin-like electronic sensing technology to overcome the limitations of traditional systems that…

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Radiation in a crematorium traced back to a human body

It wasn’t enough radiation to be alarming, but it could be a sign of an ongoing problem By Rachel Becker A crematorium in Arizona became contaminated with radiation when workers cremated a man who had received radiation treatments for cancer right before he died, a new study reports. The findings highlight a potential safety gap for…

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