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Medical Device Recruiters

Medical Device industry news

Management Recruiters of Gastonia North help keep medical device professionals tuned to the latest industry news by providing access to the latest in technologies and breakthroughs, as well as resources for both clients and candidates.

Insight: Evo or Revo? The $64,000 question

After nearly 30 years in and around the Medical Device space, I’ve seen success defined by both Evolutionary and Revolutionary products.  Both come with their own specialized set of risks – Evolutionary is generally an easier Regulatory pathway but can easily be mistaken as a “me too” product which makes gaining the attention of investors…

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Attention healthcare: Take these lessons from Hollywood

October 15: At first glance, the worlds of healthcare and Hollywood couldn’t be more different. One brings to mind images of stethoscopes, hospital beds and doctors in white coats. The other is reminiscent of the Walk of Fame, blockbuster movies and famous celebrities. But upon closer inspection, the two sectors may not be so dissimilar…

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Researchers develop biodegradable implant for nerve regeneration

October 10: Researchers from Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a biodegradable implant that accelerates nerve regeneration and improves the healing of a damaged nerve. The wireless device has been designed to wrap around an injured nerve and provide regular electricity pulses following a surgical repair process. As…

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AI System Finds Subtle Clues in Medical Images

October 9: Carnegie Mellon University alumna Shinjini Kundu is using artificial intelligence to interpret medical images in ways that humans cannot. Her program, 3D Transport-Based Morphometry, could significantly impact diagnoses and treatments for diseases. “Some statistics say that up to 80 percent of all medical diagnoses are made or confirmed through imaging studies. As imaging…

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Report: Murder victim’s Fitbit helps police charge suspect

October 5: Heart rate tracking data on a Fitbit fitness tracker has helped police investigators identify and charge a murder suspect, according to a New York Times report. Though the devices are intended mainly to monitor health and motivate users to be more active, heart rate data, sleeping patterns and physical exertion measurements can be used to…

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First Friday Preview: October 2018

3 Steps to Sourcing Contract Talent A recent NPR/Marist survey reveals that 20 percent of work in the U.S. is fulfilled by contract workers. So, no matter what industry your business serves, chances are you regularly employ contractors to augment your permanent workforce. This reality creates a continual need to source consultants, whether it be…

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A breakthrough in 3D-printed neuronal stem cells and scaffold therapy

October 3: 3D printing is a manufacturing process that involves the creation of a 3D object from a digital design. It has allowed more efficient and cost-effective production of intricate and sophisticated designs and has made great technological advances, including in healthcare. The use of 3D printing has already revolutionised the prosthetics industry and has…

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Ready or not: How medical device manufacturers can prepare for E.U. MDR

September 28: The deadline to comply with new medical device regulations in the European Union is coming up fast. Here are some ideas on getting ready for the changes. Mike Edwards, Sparta Systems [Image courtesy of Google Satellite] By mid-2020, medical device manufacturers selling products in Europe must comply with the significant regulatory changes embodied in…

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Insight: Time Management – Who manages whom?

As a manager in a manufacturing environment, any time the subject of multi-tasking/project management/time management came up; I looked like a flirtatious Peacock’s tail.  I mean, if you wanted to know whether I had it together, all you had to do was ask me.  (Make a coughing noise while saying BS at this point.) But…

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Scientists discover enzyme that converts type A and B blood into ‘universal donor’ type O

September 11: A team of researchers from the University of British Columbia has isolated an enzyme in the gut that reliably converts any type of blood into type O, which is compatible with nearly everyone. These enzymes are able to remove markers called antigens from AB, A and B blood. Approximately 7%–8% of the UK…

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Creating the Best Design Plan for Your Device

September 7: An expert in quality management discusses the importance of a quality design plan and how to map out a path to success for device makers. Every medical device on the market once began as a simple idea crafted to solve a problem. Despite the best intentions of every device developer, many of these…

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First Friday Preview: September 2018

How to implement an effective contingent workforce recruitment strategy According to Staffing Industry Analysts’ Workforce Solutions Buyer Survey 2018, respondents report that 22 percent of their staff is currently contingent, and project that by 2028 that figure will rise to 30 percent. As the blended workforce continues to grow, it’s becoming increasingly important to perfect…

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Color-Changing Sensor Detects Signs of Eye Damage in Tears

September 4: A new point-of-care rapid-sensing device can detect a key marker of eye injury in minutes—a time frame crucial to treating eye trauma. University of Illinois researchers developed a gel laden with gold nanoparticles that changes color when it reacts with a teardrop containing ascorbic acid, released from a wound to the eye. In…

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Disposable diagnostics: fighting antimicrobial resistance in the field

September 3: Dr Maria Daniela Angione of Trinity College Dublin has developed an electronic chip intended for use as part of a disposable diagnostic tool. Now undergoing preclinical trials, it could quickly detect bacterial infections and help address the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. Around 700,000 deaths each year are being attributed to antimicrobial resistance.…

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Implantable electronic device could stop epileptic seizures

August 31: A team of British and French researchers has conducted a study that assessed the use of an implantable electronic device in identifying, stopping and preventing epileptic seizures. The team comprised researchers from the UK’s University of Cambridge and France’s École Nationale Supérieure des Mines and INSERM. During the study, the researchers directly implanted…

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Students Invent Temporary Biometric Tracking Tattoo

August 30: Wichita State University students Jared Goering, Ryan Becker and Spencer Steinert are working together to positively impact lives through wearable technology. Together they created a product called Cyfive and have been perfecting it for the past three years. Cyfive is a biometric tracking temporary tattoo that lasts around three days after being applied…

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The Line Between Drugs and Devices Continues to Blur

August 30: A collaboration between Otsuka America Pharmaceutical and Magellan Health is the latest example of how the line between pharma and medtech continues to blur. Otsuka America Pharmaceutical has signed a collaboration agreement with Magellan Health designed to facilitate access to the first drug-device combination product approved by FDA to track drug ingestion. The…

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Transporting human organs: the innovations saving lives

August 29: A helicopter lands on a rain lashed hospital rooftop as white coats emerge running with what looks like a well-stickered beer cooler is a scene familiar to patrons of medical dramas, but is that really how life-saving organs are transported? The moment a donor organ is recovered, the clock is ticking to find…

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UTSA Enters Guinness World Records with Smallest Medical Robot

August 29: It can’t be seen with a human eye. It doesn’t look anything like C-3PO or R2-D2, or even BB-8. But, nevertheless, it is a robot (all 120nm of it) and its creators from The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are now world record holders in the Guinness World Records for creating…

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Researchers create ultra-thin artificial retina to restore sight

August 22: Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and Seoul National University have developed and assessed an ultra-thin artificial retina that could potentially restore sight loss in patients with retinal diseases. Said to be the first of its kind, the flexible device is based on 2D materials and is expected to improve existing…

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