Gastonia North Blog

MedTech News

Medical Device Industry News

Management Recruiters of Gastonia North help keep medical device professionals tuned to the latest industry news by providing access to the latest in technologies and breakthroughs, as well as resources for both clients and candidates.

First fully personalized tissue implant engineered from patient’s own materials and cells

November 13: In a new study, Tel Aviv University researchers reveal how they invented the first fully personalized tissue implant, engineered from a patient’s own materials and cells. The new technology makes it possible to engineer any kind of tissue implant from one small fatty tissue biopsy. “We were able to create a personalized hydrogel from…

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Blood-oxygen level sensor to enable monitoring of wound healing

November 8: Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) have created a new sensor to map blood-oxygen levels over large areas of skin, tissue and organs. As oxygen is important for healing of injuries, researchers expect that the mapping sensor would enable real-time monitoring of wound healing. Contrary to bulky fingertip oximeters, the new…

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Are you sure you have a good notified body?

November 9: You know that nice, little Medical Device Directive (the MDD) you’ve been using for 20 years to get a CE mark? You know it’s going away, right? Zero MDD certificates will be issued after May 25, 2020. And since CE marks need renewing every five years, by May 2025, everyone doing business in…

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New Efforts to Strengthen FDA’s Expanded Access Program

November 9: Since the 1970s, the FDA has helped to facilitate access to promising investigational medical products for patients with serious or immediately life-threatening diseases who are unable to access products through clinical trials. As a cancer survivor, I understand, on a very personal level, that patients who are fighting serious or life-threatening diseases want the…

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Bioresorbable Implant Monitors Brain Function After Injuries or Surgeries

November 9: A University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineer is working in collaboration with a pioneer in the field to develop an implantable optical probe that can be inserted in the brain and used to monitor brain function after traumatic injuries or surgeries, then be absorbed by the body. If successful, the device would…

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New Device Improves Balance in Veterans With Gulf War Illness

November 5: Gulf War veterans with unexplained illnesses that cause fatigue, headaches, respiratory disorders and memory problems can improve their balance with a device developed by Rutgers University researchers. The study is the first to examine how Gulf War illnesses affect veterans’ vestibular systems, which are integral for balance, memory and brain blood flow. The findings…

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FDA to speed up review of medical products for U.S. military

November 2: The U.S. FDA today announced a memorandum of understanding with the Department of Defense to accelerate regulatory assessment of medical products for military personnel. Congress last year passed a law to expedite regulatory review of products to diagnose, treat or prevent serious diseases or conditions facing U.S. military personnel. The memorandum establishes a framework to…

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Spinal stimulation implant enables paralysis patients to walk again

November 1:  A new study led by a Swiss research institute École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne has found that electrical stimulation with a wireless spinal implant could enable chronic paraplegia patients to walk again with support. The STIMO study, conducted in alliance with the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV), involved three patients with cervical spinal cord injuries…

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The top 10 medical disruptors of 2019

October 26: The Cleveland Clinic for the past 16 years has predicted what the top 10 medical disruptors will be for the following year. The health provider seeks input from 150 to 200 of its physicians, hailing from each of its institutes. The result is 300 to 400 suggestions, which the clinic then narrows down to…

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Researchers engineer ‘smart surfaces’ to repel bacteria

October 25: Researchers at McMaster University in Canada have engineered ‘smart surfaces’ with coatings claimed to be able to repel almost everything they are expected to encounter, including bacteria, viruses and living cells. The surfaces can also be modified for targeted beneficial exceptions. This feature makes it possible for implants such as vascular grafts, replacement heart…

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4 historical medical devices that will horrify you

October 23: When we look back at our medical past, we might see the early iterations of technologies today.  There were mistakes, but there were also the early seeds of progress – including the development of antibodies, ingenuity in surgical tool design, and the burgeoning of medical ethics and evidence-driven medicine. We may laugh or…

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Attention healthcare: Take these lessons from Hollywood

October 15: At first glance, the worlds of healthcare and Hollywood couldn’t be more different. One brings to mind images of stethoscopes, hospital beds and doctors in white coats. The other is reminiscent of the Walk of Fame, blockbuster movies and famous celebrities. But upon closer inspection, the two sectors may not be so dissimilar…

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Researchers develop biodegradable implant for nerve regeneration

October 10: Researchers from Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a biodegradable implant that accelerates nerve regeneration and improves the healing of a damaged nerve. The wireless device has been designed to wrap around an injured nerve and provide regular electricity pulses following a surgical repair process. As…

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AI System Finds Subtle Clues in Medical Images

October 9: Carnegie Mellon University alumna Shinjini Kundu is using artificial intelligence to interpret medical images in ways that humans cannot. Her program, 3D Transport-Based Morphometry, could significantly impact diagnoses and treatments for diseases. “Some statistics say that up to 80 percent of all medical diagnoses are made or confirmed through imaging studies. As imaging…

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Report: Murder victim’s Fitbit helps police charge suspect

October 5: Heart rate tracking data on a Fitbit fitness tracker has helped police investigators identify and charge a murder suspect, according to a New York Times report. Though the devices are intended mainly to monitor health and motivate users to be more active, heart rate data, sleeping patterns and physical exertion measurements can be used to…

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A breakthrough in 3D-printed neuronal stem cells and scaffold therapy

October 3: 3D printing is a manufacturing process that involves the creation of a 3D object from a digital design. It has allowed more efficient and cost-effective production of intricate and sophisticated designs and has made great technological advances, including in healthcare. The use of 3D printing has already revolutionised the prosthetics industry and has…

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Ready or not: How medical device manufacturers can prepare for E.U. MDR

September 28: The deadline to comply with new medical device regulations in the European Union is coming up fast. Here are some ideas on getting ready for the changes. Mike Edwards, Sparta Systems [Image courtesy of Google Satellite] By mid-2020, medical device manufacturers selling products in Europe must comply with the significant regulatory changes embodied in…

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Scientists discover enzyme that converts type A and B blood into ‘universal donor’ type O

September 11: A team of researchers from the University of British Columbia has isolated an enzyme in the gut that reliably converts any type of blood into type O, which is compatible with nearly everyone. These enzymes are able to remove markers called antigens from AB, A and B blood. Approximately 7%–8% of the UK…

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Creating the Best Design Plan for Your Device

September 7: An expert in quality management discusses the importance of a quality design plan and how to map out a path to success for device makers. Every medical device on the market once began as a simple idea crafted to solve a problem. Despite the best intentions of every device developer, many of these…

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Color-Changing Sensor Detects Signs of Eye Damage in Tears

September 4: A new point-of-care rapid-sensing device can detect a key marker of eye injury in minutes—a time frame crucial to treating eye trauma. University of Illinois researchers developed a gel laden with gold nanoparticles that changes color when it reacts with a teardrop containing ascorbic acid, released from a wound to the eye. In…

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